Friday, July 29, 2011

Highest Vocal Register - Mari Belajar.. ahhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!

Understanding Flute or Whistle Register of the Voice

Based on Oren Brown's book Discover Your Voice, I would like to explain what the highest vocal register, known as "Flute", "Whistle" or high "Falsetto" is all about. It is not an area of the voice most of us sing with unless you are Mariah Carey or a coluratura Soprano singing light operatic roles such as Lakme or Queen of the Night. However, it is a part of the voice we all have to a greater or lesser extent. Developing it increases your range and ease of high notes. I believe in developing the entire voice and this area is no exception.

Flute register starts usually around B above the staff for women and B on the staff for men. This can also be found a bit lower in the voice for lower voice types. The key is how

the sound is produced. The first important concept to understand is that there is NO sensation of reaching for high notes. There is total relaxation of the lips, tongue and jaw. For those of y

ou who have been working with me for a while this should sound very familliar. There is no healthy singing with any sort of upper body/vocal tract tension.

When this register is first experienced by the singer it just seems to pop out of him or her from nowhere. It feels detached from the throat and completely out of the singer's control. Welcome this new sensation! A light free "uh", "oo" or hum with a tiny lip opening and a gentle flow of air produces this light and free sound. The sound seems to come from nothing---it just happens. It may be on a different pitch than you intended. You will feel as if you had little or nothing to do with the sound you made. It will feel and sound very light and free. It should be a small sound, even a gentle squeak at first. As Oren Brown so accurately describes, it will seem like an entirely different voice. The note really should "pop out" by itself, or it's not true flute register. You can't force or push out these notes. They should not in any way be an extension or a straining of your head voice.

When this register is first experienced by the singer it just seems to pop out of him or her from nowhere. It feels detached from the throat and completely out of the singer's control. Welcome this new sensation! A light free

To produce flute register, the mouth is barely open, but there is a large back throat space. There is relaxation of lips, jaw and tongue. The tongue is in it's resting position by the lower front teeth. Cheek muscles are loose and the mouth corners are not spread. With a light airflow try a free hum or a sound like "uh" or "ooh" and glide down lightly on it by a 5th. If you were to start with a B you would lightly glide down to an E. Only do this as high as is comfortable and freely produced. Another way of discovering this area of the voice is a light broken apeggio 1-3-5-8-5-3-1 type of exercise. The top note should be the lightest.

It can take years to strenthen this register, but usually our goal is just to feel complete relaxation, an increase and ease of high notes and vocal freedom there. You should only practice this 5 minutes a day. Afterwards try singing in your normal head voice and see if it isn't a bit easier! Surprisingly, use of this upper register can also increase your very low notes as you have gently stretched your vocal tract.


Note: These exercises are offered to you as a service. We cannot guarantee that they will help you, although we hope that they do. The content of VocalFocus is provided for general information, reference and entertainment purposes only, and is not meant to replace voice lessons. It is impossible to teach or learn voice improvement without interaction between the teacher and student. No guarantee or warranty, either express or implied, is given with regard to the accuracy of any information provided by, or linked to, this web site and VocalFocus shall not be liable for any damages or liability, of any nature whatsoever, arising from the information or exercises provided.

© 2005 Ronni Lederman, VocalFocus.com

Sumber : http://www.vocalfocus.com/whistle.html

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